Posted in action, Australia, community, conservation, Environment, green cities, home and garden, managing change, nature, pesticides, sustainability

It’s all about the bees

 

 

Bees Image: Freepik

I was reading an article about a woman living in a Berlin apartment who is keeping bees. We do have a bee crisis and I know that Europe has different programmes to encourage back yard people to become beekeepers. Keeping them in an apartment block sounds very daring to me. I love bees and am concerned their numbers are dwindling but I understand it better now. Farms have basically become uni crop – just corn or just wheat or just lentils. Then farmers tend to use sprays which do not help the bees and are killing them. The farmers are dealing with difficult weather conditions and are doing what they can to stop their crops from being destroyed by pests or fungal diseases. If Europe can do it, we can do it. I loved watching that video. It is clever and inspiring and you can see that a back yard bee keeping exercise has turned into a business. It is well thought out and the level of care is obvious. There is also someone locally who provides honey from a back yard bee keeping establishment. I don’t know whether it’s good to keep back yard bees or not. I am going to find out. I wouldn’t want it to be a danger to myself, pets, children, people. Maybe I won’t be keeping bees. Maybe I can help someone? My plan for the new year to to find out what is offered locally by way of bee keeping courses. I then plan to find out where we have our local bee keeping people. It’s the sort of thing which could become a community project so that no one has the weight of carrying all those bees. I don’t know. I am creating a plan and then I am going to follow it through because it is not about me. It is all about the bees.

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Posted in community, fund raising, homelessness, positive mindset, resilience, teen health, wellbeing

Kids Under Cover

Kids Under Cover is a charity which is providing a simple yet effective solution to youth homelessness. Young people, like other people, become homeless for a variety of reasons. Kids Under Cover has taken on the challenge of youth homelessness to at least work on that. The video explains some of what it does.  Their site explains more:

We respond to the needs of young people at risk of becoming homeless due to extreme conflict or overcrowding within the family home, mental health issues, and the housing affordability crisis. Taking an early-intervention approach to preventing youth homelessness by combining accommodation and scholarships for young people at-risk of homelessness.

It’s the early intervention approach which is invaluable. Stepping in to resolve and solve issues before another life is stopped in its tracks. We need to find ways of supporting young people and their families through difficult circumstances and Kids Under Cover is a way of looking at a tough situation and finding a practical pathway to success. One of the things the organisation does is have a cubby house challenge  where the bespoke cubby houses are auctioned off to raise funds. You can read about it here because it is an innovative and novel approach to fund raising and awareness raising which has been very popular. It’s a great way to encourage our builders and architects and then involve the general public. All in all it’s a very positive and winning scenario. The next cubby house challenge is March 2017.

Posted in community, coping, happiness, interpersonal relationships, nature, parenting, slow living

Winter Wheat

Winter WheatMildred Walker was a very well credentialed writer who was also a creative writing teacher who dies at the age of 93 in Oregon. Her novel is about Montana where she had lived for a long time. There is no sex, no drugs , no violence and no drama. It’s a slice of life and about Montana. It held me captive for the whole time I was reading it because it was so sane and normal. It was about a young girl growing into a young woman who was discovering what love meant and who was living her life in Montana. You come to understand the rhythm of life in Montana in 1941 and you get to be a part of that life as you read the book. You can see and feel the change of seasons. You come to love the farm and the slow lifestyle. People are living rather than being entertained, stimulated or diverted. They are battling the elements and relishing the small things in life. It is such a contrast to how we are living now. The descriptions are vivid and the experiences are very real. It is not ramped up, artificial or confected. It’s life and the descriptions allow a full appreciation of the experiences in a place like Montana just before WWII. I loved being an invited guest there.

Posted in charity, community, fund raising, Haiti, helping others

Shoes for Haiti

Haiti’s earthquake victims will soon receive 50,000 pairs of shoes collected by New South Wales TAFE students to help the impoverished nation recover from the January disaster.
This is a classic example of where , if you keep things very simple, people can achieve a great deal and help others at the same time. TAFE students in NSW have collected 50 000 pairs of shoes to help the people in Haiti recover from the disaster earlier this year. In Adelaide last year or the year before one of our radio stations had and Socks and Jocks day so people could donate new socks and underwear for homeless people. The response was massive because the radio station made it an easy thing to do. That is the secret. I have also been involved in shoebox campaigns where we have been given a list of what to put in a shoebox – usually toiletries – and then a simple way of delivering the shoeboxes to a venue. All these things are easy to achieve and they bring about a good sense of community. People hate knowing others are going without. We get swamped with it all , though, so we just need something simple to do – like shoes, or socks or toothbrushes.