Posted in action, conservation, Environment, green buildings, sustainability

Eco friendly 3D printer

I want one. I want to be able to print green. I want to be able to print pots  and green decorations. Pretty sure these eco-friendly printers will take the world by storm once they get going and will transform landscaping and gardening. Designing green spaces with this eco printer or similar means there will be even more personal and creative input into landscaping. It will be a really great way to get children into gardening and will be very helpful for those who have mobility problems but still want to create green spaces. PrintGREEN was created by students Maja Petek, Tina Zidanšek, Urška Skaza, Danica Rženičnik and Simon Tržan, with help from their mentor Dušan Zidar, at the University of Maribor in Slovenia. The PrintGREEN website gives you more information about the projects of this team. They are involved with other eco-friendly projects besides this printer. The thinkingkinghumanity site gives more information and pictures to show how you can use this printer to create living prints. It’s ingenious.  I hope they are available and affordable soon. The best thing is it is all organic and can all be composted. That is sustainable living.

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Posted in Adelaide, gardening, good habits, green buildings, green cities, growth mindset, keep it simple, local produce, nature, positive attitude, recyling, slow living, South Australia, staying well, sustainability

Living Smart SA

Living Smart

The Living Smart program started in Western Australia and has been well loved and well endorsed. It has made a difference to how people perceive sustainability and the environment. It has managed to allow people to see that working together as a community preserves an environment for the future as well as allowing an opportunity to live in a healthier more welcoming environment. There is a disconnect between the people who just want to make their money and run and those who want to be part of a growth mindset which enables us to live healthily and well on this planet for generations to come. The short term , quick reward approach is hard to counter since people find it very hard to resist riches and money. It is also really hard when working conditions make it so hard for you to relax and have free time. You just want to survive and follow the path of least resistance which largely means ignoring your footprint on the earth. Living Smart has allowed people to take a step back and get rid of the fear and procrastination and just do: find out that networking and being with others is how you manage some of it, if not all of it. We now have this course in South Australia at McLaren Vale, Unley and Glenelg. I have been lucky enough to be in the McLaren Vale course and already I can see I am in a room full of people with ideas, experience, a nice way of being and that invaluable attribute of enthusiasm. It’s that enthusiasm which forges a positive road forward in terms of sustainability and the environment. It’s not an alternative. It is. It is, because you can see and implement the options and find a way of doing that so that others can do it. I grew up in an Australia which cared about the land and knew so much about natural environments. We were then submerged in suburbs but that connection with the land is unstoppable. It is now burgeoning as ecoburbia.

Posted in ageing positively, green buildings, green cities, sustainability

Living Smart

 

Living Smart is a sustainability initiative which started in Western Australia and is mushrooming now around the states. I am hoping we’ll get the courses this year in my local area. The idea is to give people proper and usable information to help them create a more sustainable lifestyle. It is quite clear from the video that people are clear about what they have achieved as facilitators and participants are very clear about what they have learned and put into use. You can get more information from the Living Smart website and on Twitter @LivingSmartAu. The good thing about this programme is that it relates to all age groups and all age groups can benefit from it and the natural sharing they do with each other.

Posted in green buildings, wellbeing, workplace health

Sick Building Syndrome

Sick Building Syndrome was frequently in the news because the air circulation in buildings had increasingly become a problem for people working in those buildings. There has been a big swing to green buildings  and better designed buildings. It is always of concern when people do not have access to fresh air in their buildings. I wonder if we have improved the situation or if it is just forgotten? The symptoms are:
  • Headache
  • Eye, nose, and throat
  • Dry cough
  • Dry, itchy skin, rashes
  • Dizziness and nausea
  • Difficulty in concentrating
  • Fatigue
  • Sensitivity to odours 
This site gives some very good information about the situation last year and then the sort of things which cause the problems, so if we are still looking at our buildings , this site gives us a good starting point.